Category Archives: Resettling in Japan

Mother & son wait 16 years for reunion

We reported, back in September, the LFNKR rescue team had successfully brought four North Korean refugees out to safe havens. One of these is Mr. Kim, who turned 22 while at a temporary holding center in Thailand.

After completing all the legal procedures, he finally arrived in Japan on Dec. 8. Awaiting him at Haneda Airport, together with the LFNKR members, was his mother, who eagerly greeted him on his arrival.

Why one young lady escaped from North Korea

On May 12, 2017, Yong-mee Lee was invited to Tokyo University to present a speech to the students.

Yong-mee Lee is one of the North Korean refugees whom LFNKR (Life Funds for North Korean Refugees) has helped to safely reach Japan and resettle here.  We are very happy to see the growing number of resettled North Korean refugees now helping LFNKR. They are actively participating in our activities to raise awareness of the difficulties still faced by the North Korean people.  The following speech was presented by Yong-mee Lee.

LFNKR’s 19th ANNUAL MEETING HELD ON OCT. 10, 2016

Annual Meeting Held in Tokyo

A summary of LFNKR activities during fiscal 2015 (Sept. 1, 2015 to Aug. 31, 2016) and the plans for the next fiscal year were outlined at the annual meeting. 

Kato Pleased with Happily Resettled North Korean Families

 

It’s well worth it

Hiroshi Kato

Hiroshi Kato, the executive director of LFNKR, participated July 3 in the annual exchange party for NK refugees held in Osaka.  Joining the party were about 50 former North Korean defectors who have resettled in the Kansai region (south-western half of Japan, including Osaka).  Attending were three generations, ranging from babies under the age of one up to 70 years-old.

Kato was overwhelmed by their boundless energy.  They sang and danced to Karaoke without a break for three hours straight.  He was very impressed by their extremely good singing … and by their dancing, which surprise him. He saw waltzes and jitterbugging rather than more traditional Korean dances.

From Supported to Supporter

5 Years Later

By K. Matsubara (alias) – Former North Korean Refugee

A Korean proverb says that “mountains and rivers change in 10 years.”  It obviously means that 10 years is a long time and brings big changes.  Then, what changes have my husband and I experienced in the past 5 years since we finally entered Japan?

Actually, we have gone through many, many changes.  For a while after coming to Japan, everything seemed new to us and difficult to get used to.  But now, we can handle most things without asking for help.  Although we have not yet achieved our biggest goal, I feel that we have achieved great growth both spiritually and financially.  And we are now able to help other North Korean people needing assistance.

Price of Freedom Soaring

I Want to See my Daughters as Soon as Possible

By Pak Sung Hee (alias), a Former NK Refugee

I once lived in Chongjin, North Hamgyong.  From the 1990’s (the time of the “Arduous March”) through early 2000 we experienced severe starvation.  I realized that my whole family would starve to death if something didn’t change, so I crossed the Tumen River into China to bring back food.  I bitterly regret, however, that I was never able to make it back to Chongjin where my family was waiting for me.

My father is Japanese, and my mother was an ethnic Korean resident of Japan.  Years earlier my parents had believed the propaganda claiming that North Korea was a Paradise on Earth. So, together, they immigrated to North Korea.

North Korean “Inari-Sushi” and the Party to View Cherry Blossoms

By K.K. (a former North Korean refugee)

NEWS100PhotoBack in April, LFNKR had a cherry blossom viewing party.  At this party were members of LFNKR and also some of the former North Korean defectors who have resettled here in Japan.  The following is a brief article we received from one of the North Korean participants.  It was she who prepared and brought the unique spicy North Korean “inari-sushi” (fried bean-curd stuffed with boiled rice).

She writes:

I was born in North Korea, and I was able to come to Japan, thanks to Japanese humanitarian aid. At that time I knew absolutely nothing about the cultures or traditions of any other country. 

From N.K. Refugee to Licensed Nurse in Japan

Near the end of March this year, we at LFNKR got some exciting news. Miss K.H., whom  we have mentioned here before (see links below), had just passed Japan’s very difficult National Nursing Exam, and she was writing to tell us of her experiences:

She says:

Thanks to the support and help that the people around me have extended, I passed the National Nursing Examination!